SARAH KAVAGE

I’m a Seattle based visual artist and cultural organizer who makes art about place. 

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Duwamish River Projects
Lenapehoking Projects
Coast Salish Meadow Projects 
Body Projects
Chicago Projects 

ABOUT

PAINTING & DESIGN


SARAH KAVAGE

I’m a Seattle based visual artist who makes artwork about place. 

HOME
    Duwamish Projects
    Lenapehoking Projects
    Coast Salish Meadow Projects
    Body Projects
    Chicago Projects
ABOUT
PAINTING & DESIGN

TUKWILA AiR

2019-2022

In 2018, Olisa Enrico and I were selected as Tukwila’s first two artists in residence. My focus was on the Duwamish River. We were given a small budget for creating public programming and artwork, and served as part time city employees for a year. We were welcomed and supported as we tried to build relationships, learn, and navigate this small, incredibly diverse city along the river. Here’s some of what I did with my budget and time.

Photos
Bruce Clayton Tom, Sarah Kavage

Video
Jeff Encke

Confluence Tukwila: Rivers Presentations by Paulina Lopez, De’Sean Quinn, Emma Sanchez, Sophorn Sim, and Ken Workman (Duwamish) at Tukwila’s Sullivan Center. Confluence Tukwila is a storytelling event series presented by Action Tukwila, a community group; I curated and emceed this edition.



Nature Storytelling was a series of 3 public outdoor storytelling workshops, each led by a prominent storyteller and focused on a different storytelling tradition.
Paul Che Oke Ten Wagner (Saanich), storyteller and musician
Black Stax, musicians and lyricists
Kathleen Flenniken, poet





Welcome the Water brought the community together to honor of the water, the Duwamish River, the salmon, and the change of the seasons. Artists included Roldy Aguero Ablao, Roquin-Jon Quichocho Siongco, Adria Garcia, and Chelsea Hendrickson

Photos by Bruce Clayton Tom



Hello River Mural
We made this mural on the riverside trail at the Tukwila Community Center! I worked with young folks at the community center to design and paint the mural.
Here’s a picture of it from the air, as part of a Seattle Met photo essay by David Ryder.